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What are the speed camera margins?


As in the UK, speed cameras in France allow a margin for error, this does however vary as to whether the camera is a fixed camera or a mobile one mounted in either police cars or in the increasing number of privately operated 'radar' cars. For all speed cameras, these values ​​are specified by an Act of Government relating to road control speed cameras.

The tolerance margin of fixed speed cameras Fixed speed cameras include all the devices used in a fixed manner, whether they are in a vehicle parked on the side of the road, a permanently fixed radar or a hand held camera used by a gendarme. In all of these cases, the tolerance applied is 5 km/h when the measured speed is below 100 km/h, and 5% above 100 km/h. For example, if you are flashed at 87 km/h on a road limited to 80, the tolerance is 5 km/h and the speed estimated for the fine is 82 km/h. Similarly, if you are recorded at 138 km/h on a road limited to 130, the tolerance is 5% (i.e. 6.5 km/h, rounded up to 7) and your recorded speed is 131 km/h.

The tolerance margin of mobile speed cameras The radars mounted in a moving vehicle are different: in fact, the 'Gatso Millia' model, infamous for being installed in unmarked cars that can be driven by gendarmes as well as those operated by private individuals, has a greater tolerance. In this case, the tolerance applied is 10 km/h when the measured speed is below 100 km/h, and 10% above 100 km/h. For example, if you are recorded at 91 km/h on a road limited to 80, the tolerance is 10 km/h and the speed recorded for the offence is 81 km/h. Similarly, if you are captured at 144 km/h on a road limited to 130, the tolerance is 10% (i.e. 13 km/h) and your recorded speed is 131 km/h.


The simple solution to avoiding any confusion regarding these margins of error is to always keep well within the marked speeds.

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